EU flag_destroyed schoolHidden in the small print of the 27 & 28 June European Council conclusions – eclipsed by the crisis in Greece, the row about migration and the UK’s bid to renegotiate the terms of its membership of the EU – was an important commitment to continue the process of reflection leading to an “EU global strategy on foreign and security policy”.

The challenges facing Europe today have global implications and require global solutions. In an op-ed originally published on Euractiv, the directors of the European Think Tanks Group argue that from the Greek crisis to migration and climate change, the EU must seek answers beyond its borders.

Read the article here.

Credit: Friends of Europe

Credit: Friends of Europe

In a rapidly changing and interdependent world, Europe’s new leaders need to adopt a global perspective in European policy-making, a new understanding of the EU’s global role, and in particular, a new approach to international development. In this event hosted by Friends of Europe in Brussels on 10 September 2014, we asked whether the European Think Tanks Group’s 2014 report ‘Our Collective Interest: Why Europe’s problems need global solutions and global problems need European action’ offer the sort of answers needed.

See the programme here and watch a recording of the event here.

Chad food programme DG ECHO

Image: Rein Skullerud, Flickr

As the new EU leadership team prepares to take office in Brussels, we’ve joined forces with our partners in the European Think Tanks Group (ETTG) with our latest publication: ‘Our Collective Interest: Why Europe’s problems need global solutions and global problems need European action’.

In this report, 28 authors from the four think tanks argue that the EU’s ambitions for its own citizens – for prosperity, peace and environmental sustainability – cannot be divorced from its global responsibilities and opportunities. A collective effort is in our shared interest.

We identified five global problems which will shape the future of the EU and the world, and where the EU has a comparative advantage to act:

  • The world economy
  • Environmental sustainability
  • Peace and security
  • Democracy and human rights
  • Poverty and inequality.

Read the full report here and see this infographic for a summary of our recommendations. The executive summary is available in French, German and Spanish.

In a major forthcoming report for the new EU leadership, the European Think Tanks Group (ETTG) makes the case for joined-up thinking across the institutions and policies of the EU to address five global challenges: climate change; poverty and inequality; trade and financial policy; conflict and security and democracy and human rights.

Read more here.

Click here to read the EDCSP team’s monthly update for November

The European Commission’s new proposed development strategy – Agenda for Change – puts ‘inclusive and sustainable growth for human development’ at its centre. At the 2012 European Development Days conference, the European Think-Tanks Group hosted a high-level panel debate putting the word ‘inclusive’ under the spotlight, focusing specifically on the challenge to EU development policy posed by inequality in developing countries.

Watch the debate here.

The European Think-Tanks Group, four of Europe’s leading think-tanks have published a joint briefing paper:

The EU’s Multi-Annual Financial Framework post-2013: Options for EU development cooperation

 As negotiations around Europe’s post-2013 multi-annual financial framework (MFF) begin, there are major questions around the comparative advantage of a Europe-wide approach to development assistance, and the role of the EU in the future global aid architecture. What should this aid be for? How should it be managed? How can European aid adapt to a development landscape that is going through such rapid change, and address current and emerging global challenges?
The paper reviews this landscape and proposes and analyses a set of options on:

    1. Rethinking priorities and assistance towards MICs and emerging economies;
    2. Ensuring enough flexibility to respond to unforeseen needs;
    3. Dealing with climate finance;
    4. Ensuring adequate long-term funding to strengthen security and development linkages;
    5. Budgetising or maintaining a separate European Development Fund.